Giving, Receiving & Learning Advice

Published on December 13, 2011

Much like the Holidays, it’s said that it’s better to give than to receive.  When making decisions about your next career move, the same is true.

As a small child, we’re granted little decision in listening to what others expect of us.  “Wash your hands before dinner!  Make your bed before breakfast!  Do your homework before television!”  But as maturity grows and expectations rise, as a teenager many of us found ourselves questioning the same authority that taught us all we knew.

One of the biggest steps I took in my life was my decision for college.  Choosing an out-of-state destination, moving from the South to the North, and knowingly choosing debt in the thousands rather than the hundreds was something I had to debate amongst both family and friends.  But I had a goal, and I knew my first step in reaching it was to be in New York City.

Where do you dream of seeing yourself in ten years?  What actions will get you there?  You are the pilot of your own plane.  Would you land in Mexico instead of Brazil because someone suggested Spanish is easier to learn than Portuguese?

In this same essence, you must take advice with a grain of salt.  Some of them will save you, while others will lead you astray.  Advice should always be appreciated, given that it usually means the person genuinely cares about your success.  But you must decide on your own accord—to give it to another, to receive it respectfully for yourself, or to leave it as is.

Sometimes the best advice you can receive is from yourself, but the knowledge from others should never go undervalued.  Check out a few of the most influential quotes from our Live Civil Twitter Page and influential people throughout time:

Don’t take “NO” for an answer when you can create your own “YES”!

“Whatever we believe about ourselves and our ability comes true for us.”

Always be a first-rate version of yourself instead of a second-rate version of someone else.

 I don’t know the key to success, but the key to failure is trying to please everybody.

Cherish your visions and dreams as they are the children of your soul; the blueprints of your ultimate achievements.

The most important requirement in success is learning to overcome failure. You must learn to tolerate it, but never accept it.

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